Franke: After Modernity, What?

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The history of western civilization is generally divided into three epochs, if memory serves from my junior high world history class. This classification scheme was retroactively applied by historians trying to make sense of why things changed so dramatically at certain points in time.

Michael Hicks: What does new GDP data tell us about the Hoosier economy?

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The U.S. Department of Commerce is reviewing the National Income Accounts, which measure the size and composition of our economy. This process is undertaken every few years, as better measurement tools are available. Right now, the data only extends back to 2017, but it tells a few interesting stories about the Hoosier economy.

Dunn: Why Trump Will Triumph

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If Jefferson Davis, who led the Confederacy in a multi-year war against the United States, could not be convicted for that little act of insurrection that is commonly known as the “Civil War,” how can we believe that former (and perhaps future) President Trump could possibly be convicted for insurrection?

Editorial: BMV collects millions selling drivers’ information

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The (Fort Wayne) Journal Gazette

Adkins: Understanding the causes of inflation

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Will inflation be a reason voters boot out Joe Biden? That is what Republicans and a fair share of Democrats believe. I can’t rule that out in my crystal ball for prognosticating the world of 2024. However, I am not convinced. Sure, of Americans polled recently 62% rate the U.S. economy as “very” or “fairly” bad compared to 34% who see it as “very” or “fairly” good. But those varied viewpoints are created by two principal factors: political affiliation and income levels. Those who are hyper-political see the economy as good when their man is in the White House and bad when it is occupied by someone from the opposing party. Therefore, when the media announces positive economic results, one side cheers and the other turns a deaf ear. One study revealed that this phenomenon is significantly greater among Republicans, by a factor of 50%. Democrats need not be concerned about that portion of the 62% who are Republicans. As the late Larry Gosset once told, me they wouldn’t “vote for Jesus Christ if he ran as a Democrat.” Democrats should, on the other hand, be very concerned about those who are independents. They, rather than Republican voters, will decide if the economy seals Joe Biden’s fate.

Editorial: Better dementia training can’t wait

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The Washington Post