5 things to know for Monday in Pennsylvania



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A daily look at late-breaking news, coming events and stories that will be talked about in Pennsylvania on Monday:

SEARCH FOR TROOPER ASSASSIN SUSPECT SHIFTS AS POLICE FEAR WOODS MAY BE BOOBY-TRAPPED

The search for 31-year-old Eric Frein entered its 17th day Monday. Authorities believe they have Frein contained within a 5-square-mile perimeter around his parents' home in Canadensis, miles away from the Blooming Grove barracks where he allegedly killed one trooper and wounded another the night of Sept. 12.

PENNSYLVANIA CHIEF JUSTICE CASTILLE WANTS NAMES IF ANY JUDGES RECEIVED PORNOGRAPHIC EMAILS

Castille says any judge exchanging grossly pornographic emails might have violated ethical rules over the use of court equipment or the state's code of judicial ethics. Attorney General Kathleen Kane says hundreds of inter-office pornographic emails sent or received on state computers between 2008 and 2012 were discovered during its review of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse prosecution.

STATE-OWNED UNIVERSITIES SEE ENROLLMENT DROP FOR FOURTH STRAIGHT YEAR

Preliminary reports show that enrollment is dropping 1.5 percent to below 111,000 students at the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education schools. It peaked at just above 119,000 in 2010. The system includes 14 schools.

FEDERAL JUDGE MUST DECIDE IF PRIEST REMAINS JAILED UNTIL HE FACES INTERNATIONAL ABUSE, CHILD pornography CHARGES

The Rev. Joseph Maurizio is charged with traveling to Honduras to have sex with children he claimed to be helping through a charity. His attorney says the charges are unfounded. A federal magistrate in Johnstown must decide if Maurizio remains jailed after a hearing Monday.

GHOST RIDERS ON THE BUS

Transit agencies across Pennsylvania are being scrutinized by the state over the subsidies they claim for transporting riders 65 years old and older, with at least four agencies being docked millions of dollars for inflating senior ridership numbers. In the wake of the so-called "ghost rider" scandal in northeastern Pennsylvania many transit agencies in other parts of the state are reporting sharply lower senior ridership numbers.

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