The Wizards' John Wall is an All-Star for the third time but still has to work to earn recognition with so many "top-tier" point guards around the NBA



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WASHINGTON — Fresh off scoring 51 points against the Washington Wizards, reigning NBA MVP Stephen Curry praised John Wall, who dropped a quiet 41 against the Warriors.

"He's a top-tier point guard," Curry said, "and it's like that — not his caliber every night — but obviously at the point guard position you're going to have some talent on the other side of the ball most nights."

Wall has never played better in what is now a point-guard league.

It doesn't stop with Curry. The talent pool includes Cleveland's Kyrie Irving, Toronto's Kyle Lowry, Boston's Isaiah Thomas, Portland's Damian Lillard, Oklahoma City's Russell Westbrook and the Los Angeles Clippers' Chris Paul, to name a few.

"I think I'm having a career year," Wall said. "I can say I'm playing my best basketball, but not the way I want to play because it's not equaling up to wins."

Wall is an All-Star for the third time but gets lost in the packed field of "top-tier" point guards. His 20.1 points a game are sixth at the position, while his 9.9 assists are third behind only Sacramento's Rajon Rondo and Westbrook.

But some nights there is just no denying his talents.

Like Tuesday at New York's Madison Square Garden, Wall had 28 points and 17 assists to lead Washington past the Knicks. It was another showcase performance during a season that hasn't gone the way he or the Wizards have wanted.

The Wizards will be a sub-.500 team and outside the Eastern Conference playoff picture at the All-Star break. Injuries to sidekick Bradley Beal and many others have hampered Washington this season.

But Wall is holding up his end and is playing like a top-five point guard.

He has an all-around game — the ability to beat defenders off the dribble, to spot up, pass, use his court vision and rebound. As Celtics coach Brad Stevens said recently, "you have to pick your poison" when defending Wall.

"Being able to shoot the ball off the pick and roll with great consistency — that's what makes defenses choose what to do next," Stevens said. "He's been a great passer off the pick and roll."

There's no shortage of admiration around the league for Wall, who Philadelphia 76ers coach Brett Brown deemed "the fastest guard in the NBA." Brown compared Wall to a Maserati sports car and said the 25-year-old has improved because "you learn how to drive your Maserati better."

Much of Wall's game has improved in his six pro seasons since he was the first overall pick out of Kentucky in 2010.

"His speed is probably second to none in the NBA. ... He's a one-man fast break and it's crazy because he logs so many minutes," Warriors guard Klay Thompson said. "His midrange jumper is also so much improved. You can tell he's been working on his game a lot, and you like to see that from guys."

Wall doesn't get the headlines like Curry, Irving or even Thomas, of late. He has only scored the most points in a game he's played in eight times this season, but Wall is the kind of player that teams have to game-plan against.

"You've got to build a wall against Wall," Cavaliers star LeBron James said. "You let him play in open court one-on-one, he's too fast, he's too strong. He's going to put your defense at bay."

Opponents have tried to close off Wall's drives to the basket and force him to take jump shots. At times, it has worked, like when the Trail Blazers limited him to 4 of 17 shooting in a victory last month.

"When you're playing against an All-Star-caliber player like him, you work as hard as you can, you try and contain his penetration and hope he misses some jumpers," Portland coach Terry Stotts said.

More often than not, Wall makes the most of his time and space. Even so, Washington coach Randy Wittman believes Curry should get more recognition than Wall because of team results.

"John's body of work has been pretty good; he's been recognized with that," Wittman said. "You've got to go out and play, you've got to go out and win. Those are the two things in our league. You want recognition? Be a winner and play your butt off. That's how you get recognition, and John's gotten it."


NBA writer Brian Mahoney contributed to this report.

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