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World Thinking Day brings attention to Girl Scouts


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Caylie Langston, 8, presents her project on Panama to Katie Rigney, 5, Sunday during the Girl Scouts World Thinking Day program at the Hancock County 4-H Fairgrounds. (Noelle M. Steele/Daily Reporter)
Caylie Langston, 8, presents her project on Panama to Katie Rigney, 5, Sunday during the Girl Scouts World Thinking Day program at the Hancock County 4-H Fairgrounds. (Noelle M. Steele/Daily Reporter)


GREENFIELD — The Hancock County Fairgrounds was abuzz with activity Sunday during a Girl Scout-themed multicultural event for kids.

Each February, Girls Scouts across the globe commemorate World Thinking Day, an event aimed at raising awareness of Scouting.

Locally, the event drew about 200 Girl Scouts on Sunday to the fairgrounds, where troops set up booths with a display about the state or country of their choice.

Sitting beside the Georgia booth was a woman wearing a special nametag – Juliette Low.

Her real name is Cheryl Curry, and she’s a regional membership director for the Girl Scouts; but Sunday, she was portraying the program’s founder, southern accent and all.

When Curry puts on her scouting hat and trench coat, she’s a decent lookalike for the woman featured on the inside of the World Thinking Day booklet.

“I kind of look like her, actually,” Curry said.

The average person might not be familiar with the story of Low, who started the program in Savannah, Ga., in 1912, but it’s the stuff of Girl Scout legend.

Today, there are 40,000 Girl Scouts in central Indiana alone and an estimated 3 million worldwide. And it all started with Low’s famous troop of 18 youngsters.

“Girl Scouts know – they study her,” Curry said, dropping her southern accent when the youngest Scouts were out of earshot. “When I tell ’em I’m 153 years old, they’re like ‘whoa’ because they believe me. They eat it up.”

The February event is a favorite among Scouts, said Curry, noting that booths offering traditional food items from their country are always the most popular.

Girl Scout Harley Peavler, 12, agreed, and she had a strategy for making the most of the day.

Get the food first.

Of course, someone had to man Harley’s booth on Ethiopia (complete with Johnny cakes and Ethiopian fruit punch) in the meantime.

“We just have our parents do it,” the Girl Scout confessed.

The unofficial vote for best booth always goes to the one with the best food, the Scouts agreed.

“The best was China,” said 13-year-old Peyton Stephens, whose vote was really for the fried rice and egg drop soup.

Displays also offered fun facts about the country or state they represented, and the Girl Scouts were challenged to answer trivia questions at each station. The answers could be found on the display posters.

Cailey Langston was most looking forward to the end of the event, because that was when she could count on getting the coveted World Thinking Day badge.

“It says we earned something in Girl Scouts,” she said.

Every year, the event proves part educational, part social, Curry said.

“It’s so neat they can come and be with their sister Girl Scouts and learn something at the same time,” she said.

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