Off the Shelves – June 29

AT THE LIBRARY

New items are available at the Hancock County Public Library.

The following item is available at the Hancock County Public Library, 900 W. McKenzie Road. For more information on the library’s collection or to reserve a title, visit hcplibrary.org.

Adult Fiction

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“All Our Wrong Todays: a novel,” by Elan Mastai

It’s 2016 and in Tom Barren’s world, technology has solved all of humanity’s problems: no war, no poverty, no under-ripe avocadoes. Still, Tom isn’t happy; he’s lost the girl of his dreams. And what do you do when you’re heartbroken and have a time machine? Something stupid. Finding himself stranded in a terrible alternate reality, which we immediately recognize as our 2016, Tom is desperate to fix his mistake and go home — right up until the moment he discovers wonderfully unexpected versions of his family, his career and the woman who may just be the love of his life. Now Tom faces an impossible choice: Go back to his perfect but loveless life or stay in a messy reality with his soulmate by his side. His search for the answer takes him across continents and timelines in a quest to figure out who he really is and what his future is supposed to be.

Adult Nonfiction

“Why Won’t You Ever Apologize?: healing big betrayals and every day hurts,” by Dr. Harriet Goldhor Lerner

Renowned psychologist Dr. Harriet Lerner has been studying apologies for more than two decades. She offers compelling stories and solid theory that bring home how much a simple apology matters and what is required for healing when the hurt we’ve inflicted (or received) is far from simple. Readers learn how to craft a deeply meaningful “I’m sorry” and avoid apologies that only deepen the original injury. The book also addresses the needs of the one who has been hurt by someone who won’t apologize, tell the truth or feel remorse. Lerner explains what drives non-apologizers and the over-apologizers, as well as why the people who do the worst things are the least able to own up. She helps the injured person resist pressure to forgive too easily and challenges the popular notion that forgiveness is the only path to peace of mind.