Sound Off – March 25

•The Greenfield-Central School Board received a $50,000 donation for its artificial turf project that came with one request: Put #blesstheworld on the football field. The board debated the religious connotation of the phrase and tabled the matter until April; meanwhile, we asked you what you thought: Is #blesstheworld the tagline for a generous gesture or an inappropriate message for a public school?

•Could be any religion, the way it is worded, so I do not see a problem. Wouldn’t anyone want the world blessed?

•A donation does not have strings attached. This is paid advertising. Now think about it in its true light.

•It’s not about what we think of it — a lovely idea. The point is how the court would interpret it/the risk of a lawsuit.

•History books in public schools are stuffed full of misguided propaganda. What’s the difference?

•But who will pay for the legal bills?

•I’m not a religious person and feel this is appropriate! It doesn’t say anything that is just one religion, and if there was a lawsuit, it could easily be removed. Just make sure it’s in the agreement that, if the issue arose, it could be removed and no money returned.

•For crying out loud.

•A blessing in any religion or spiritual practice is a good thing! It’s a humanity thing! Be blessed, one and all!

•It doesn’t say, ”God Bless the World,” so why not?

•That is a whole lot of money that could be used better elsewhere. How about really blessing an organization?

•Great message for the children/young adults that will be playing there!

•“Bless the world” doesn’t sound religious to me. When people sneeze, we say, “Bless you,” — is that religious?

•Love the phrase, waste of $50k.

•I would love to see this happen. Who doesn’t need a reminder to bless others and the world through kindness, sportsmanship, etc.?

•Sports are extracurricular activities and not done during school hours. Children choose to participate.

•Religion? I don’t see anything religious about this. I see no mention of God. Yes, let it be on the field. Why not?

•I don’t have a football player, but I have a marching band member and a cheerleader that will be on that field next year, and I want nothing more than for them to bless the world every day in every thing they do!

•To those who are wanting to donate this money, thank you. You’re not only blessing the football team but our wonderful marching band as well. If it was a business wanting to put their name or logo, there would be no one even questioning accepting the donation. Sad world we live in that definitely needs more blessing.

•Be the change you wish to see. Paying it forward and wishing the best for others (other than just yourself) is humanity at its finest.

•The school would have to pay attorneys’ fees if a lawsuit were filed, and that lawsuit would have at least a decent chance of prevailing. It’s just the messed-up world we live in, but it’s something to consider. Is it worth thousands of dollars in litigation fees and costs?

•Should not be there. There should not be any religious text on city property. There are other ways to word this that can mean doing better for the world.

•The word “blessed” can be tied to religion OR to bestowing good! Someone will always want to argue the religious side to make others suffer. To those people, I say, show me one person who does not want something good bestowed upon them.

•Put it on the field! People don’t like it, then they don’t have to go support them. More people in this town will back this than oppose it.

•People, whether religious or not, use the term “bless you” when others sneeze. #blesstheworld is no different. This should be a non-issue.

•A hashtag, really? That’s the silliest thing I’ve ever heard of! Looks like advertising, not a donation. A school logo should be the only thing on this field.

•Donations are just that; there shouldn’t be stipulations for it. That way, the school is not put in this position.

•Sends hope and positivity, something we need more of in the world today! I would love to see my community support this!

•What happens when someone from the community approaches the ACLU to protest this message? From where does the money come to pay for the defense of our position? It seems to me as the world goes nowadays, there WILL be a challenge to this. I would question from where the money for the inevitable defense will come? And what organization within the school may suffer because of having to defend that which many of us view as a “harmless saying”? I think taking note of that inevitability is prudent.